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THIS BOCA STARTUP IS JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED

Brian Garr, formerly CEO of LinguaSys, is turning his energies to healthcare tech with a medical scheduling app.  © Mark Freerks
Brian Garr, formerly CEO of LinguaSys, is turning his energies to healthcare tech with a medical scheduling app. © Mark Freerks

Brian Garr had his heart set on building the next “killer” medical app for Google Glass. When his cardiologist told him that idea wouldn’t pan out, however, the Boca Raton serial entrepreneur turned to keeping doctors’ revenues from flatlining.

Garr, who’s fresh from selling the technology assets of his prior venture LinguaSys, credits his physician Jean-Pierre Awaida with the idea behind his new company Doc-quick. At a check-up last March, the Delray Beach cardiologist listened to Garr go on about his plan for creating a medical data tool that physicians wearing augmented reality glasses could use. Awaida instead suggested Garr use his 21st-century tools to solve a much older and persistent problem for clinicians – what to do when patients simply don’t show up for appointments.

“Doctors have this enormous problem that’s no one’s ever worked on,” Garr told the South Florida Business Journal. “Anywhere from 15 [percent] to 20 percent of their patients are no-shows some days. It became apparent to me that this was indeed a huge opportunity and one that no one was filling.”

After working as an executive at two different language-related technology firms, Garr said he’s making the leap to health tech as “there’s an awful lot of investment dollars in the health care field.” His company’s software, a mobile app Garr says has already been developed, is meant to be used by patients looking to see doctors right away due to medical emergencies. It would match those patients with doctors who, due to cancellations, have unexpected openings on their schedule.

Garr describes Doc-quick as a competitor to ZocDoc, which allows patients to book doctor appointments online. He claims Doc-quick will feature a cheaper subscription model for doctors, and will focus on solving the “no-show problem.” Garr says that issue alone “is a $40 billion opportunity.”

Doc-quick is currently looking for $250,000 in angel money to build a marketing and sales team, and targeting an October launch.

As for the brainchild behind the idea, he’s fully backing the venture. Dr. Awaida is co-founder and chief medical officer of the company.